Tribal Government


Organized under the auspices of the Idaho Supreme Court



Coeur d'Alene Tribe


I. History of self-governance


The government of the Coeur d’Alene Tribe has existed since time immemorial. Each Coeur d’Alene village had a council. Larger villages had principal and assistant headmen who regulated community economic, social, and religious affairs. Power was based upon persuasion and public opinion. The strongest sanction was exile, which was reserved for serious offenses. Band chiefs, war leaders, and hunting leaders yielded particular influence. Today, the Tribe is organized under a Constitution approved by the Bureau of Indian Affairs on September 2, 1949, and amended in 1961. The constitution provides for a tribal council to serve as the governing body of the Tribe and establishes all tribal members of voting age as the General Council, among other things.


A.  Tribal Governing Body: Seven member Tribal Council; elected to 3-year terms; staggered expiration years.
B.  Structure of Tribal Government: Voting membership can legislate by initiative or referendum.
C.  Tribal Committee that oversees Tribal Court: Law and Order Committee


 


Law and Order Administrator: Charles Matheson


II. Tribal governing body


III. Structure of tribal government


IV. Tribal oversight of Tribal Court



Kootenai Tribe of Idaho


I. History of self-governance


The government of the Kootenai Tribe has existed since time immemorial. Historically, the Tribe was governed by a hereditary chief. A constitution was adopted which was approved by the Bureau of Indian Affairs on June 16, 1947, which provided for a democratic form of government. The Constitution establishes a Tribal Council as the governing body of the tribe.



II. Tribal governing body


Five member Tribal Council with four elected members having staggered three-year terms and one lifetime hereditary chief



III. Structure of tribal government


Voting membership can legislate by initiative or referendum



IV. Tribal oversight of Tribal Court


Tribal Council has oversight of the Tribal Court




Nez Perce Tribe


I. History of self-governance


The government of the Nez Perce Tribe has existed since time immemorial. The aboriginal structure was based upon villages, bands, and composite bands. Villages had headmen and more powerful councils, as did the bands. Composite band councils were made up of band leaders and prominent warriors. There were also individual leaders for specific functions such as hunting, fishing, and war. The earliest form of non-traditional government was a Farm Committee established in the 1930s. A Constitution was approved by the Bureau of Indian Affairs in 1958, and revised and approved again in 1961. The Constitution establishes the Nez Perce Tribal Executive Committee as the governing body of the Tribe.



II. Tribal governing body


The Nez Perce Tribal Executive Committee (NPTEC) is comprised of nine elected members; three-year terms; staggered expiration years with three positions elected each year.



III. Structure of tribal government


Under the Constitution and By-Laws of the Nez Perce Tribe, NPTEC has been delegated the governmental powers of the Tribe. There are seven subcommittees on which NPTEC members sit. Each subcommittee has specific subject matter responsibility, hears matters within that area, and makes reports and recommendations back to NPTEC. Most tribal programs and departments are directly under one of the seven subcommittees. The tribal sub-committee that oversees tribal court is the Law and Order/Intergovernmental Affairs Subcommittee.



IV. Tribal oversight of Tribal Court


Law and Order/Intergovernmental Affairs Subcommittee.




Shoshone-Bannock Tribes


I. History of self-governance


The government of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes has existed since time immemorial. Traditional tribal government was based upon small bands of closely related families. The acquisition of the horse affected their traditional form of government with some groups retaining pre-horse culture and others that adopted horses and established larger local groups and stronger, more specialized leadership. Leaders in horse bands were elected by councils comprised of male family heads and prominent warriors. Today the Tribe is organized under the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934 and has a Constitution approved on April 30, 1936, and a charter ratified on April 17, 1937. The Constitution establishes the Fort Hall Business Council as the governing body of the Tribe.



II. Tribal governing body


Seven Member Business Council; elected for 2-year terms



III. Structure of tribal government


Democratic



IV. Tribal oversight of Tribal Court


Tribal Chairman has direct responsibility for Court.




Shoshone-Paiute Tribes


I. History of self-governance


The tribe is organized under the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934. The Constitution and Bylaws were approved in April of 1936 and establishes The Business Council as the governing body of the tribe.



II. Tribal governing body


Shoshone-Paiute Business Council consists of one chairman and six council members, each elected for three-year terms.



III. Structure of tribal government


Democratic



IV. Tribal oversight of Tribal Court


Law & Order Committee

Coeur d'Alene Tribe

P O Box 408

Plummer, ID 83851-9704

(208) 274-3101

Fax: (208) 274-2824

 

Kootenai Tribe

County Road 38A

P O Box 1269

Bonners Ferry, ID 83805

(208) 267-3519

Fax: (208) 267-2962

 

Nez Perce Tribe

P O Box 305

Lapwai, ID 83540

(208) 843-2253

Fax: (208) 843-7354

 

Shoshone-Bannock Tribes

P O Box 306

Fort Hall, ID 83203-

(208) 238-3700

Fax: (208) 237-0797

 

Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

P O Box 637

Blackfoot, ID 99924

(208) 785-7401

Fax: (208) 785-2206